Friday, April 25, 2014
Bo's case shows resilience of rule of law
Global Times | April 11, 2012 00:55
By Global Times
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Bo Xilai left the meeting room during the Fifth Session of the 11th National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 9. Photo: the Beijing News

 

The Central Committee of CPC announced Tuesday the suspension of Bo Xilai's membership from the Central Committee and its Politburo.

Bo's wife and one orderly of his family were suspected to be connected to the death of British businessman Neil Heywood. The case is now under investigation.

The high-profile case has finally brought an initial conclusion to two months of speculations and rumors. This emergency, starting from former deputy mayor of Chongqing Wang Lijun seeking refuge at the US consulate in Chengdu in February, shows that China has its own resilience. It is not easily disrupted by sudden incidents.

Law is the base to deal with problems at all levels. This is the foundation for China to keep a healthy political structure.

When the Wang Lijun case was disclosed, the government did not cover it up but initiated an investigation accordingly. This is no longer the era where China would rather cover issues up to avoid revealing problems.

The CPC's decision against Bo highlights that nobody is above the law and discipline in China. Power abuses are not allowed no matter how superior one's authority is. Local affairs cannot be dominated by an individual's interests.

The development of the country, including the problems associated with it, is within the control of the authorities, as this sudden incident has shown. The authority of the CPC Central Committee is ensured by the smooth development of the country and resolute investigation of rule-breaking cases. This time, authority has shone through again. Public opinion has been expecting a clear stance from the CPC Central Committee recently, showing public support and acknowledgement of it.

This incident has had dramatic twists but the process following it has been smooth. The country has steadily overcome a bump before the 18th National Congress of the CPC.

Such reliability is important to China. It ensures the country will not be distracted from its main goal by such emergencies.

Reliability is expected from the top government, and from the grass-roots as well. 

Although the latter's voice often appears to be chaotic when looking at public information platforms, at its core lies a strong wish for stability. The Chinese people don't want their personal and social development disturbed by any unexpected events or foreign interference.

Thus, two major events will remain steady in China. The country will continuously carry out reform and opening-up and will stick to its fundamental political system.

In fact, the political choice it has made will dwarf many of today's breaking news in history.

What this case has brought to China is merely occasional. China is moving fast. In a few months, the global limelight will pour on the country's 18th CPC National Congress. Chinese society will quickly shift its interest away from Chongqing to Beijing then, for that event will lead them into the future.


Related Report

 

Bo removed from Politburo 

 

The Central Committee of the Communist Party of China (CPC) has decided to suspend Bo Xilai's membership of the CPC Central Committee Political Bureau and the CPC Central Committee, as he is suspected of being involved in serious discipline violations.


CPC Central Committee to investigate into Bo Xilai's serious violations

As Comrade Bo Xilai is suspected of being involved in serious discipline violations, the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China (CPC) has decided to suspend his membership of the CPC Central Committee Political Bureau and the CPC Central Committee, in line with the CPC Constitution and the rules on investigation of CPC discipline inspection departments.

The Central Commission for Discipline Inspection of the CPC will file the case for investigation.

Source: Xinhua

Police reinvestigate death of Neil Heywood according to law

Chinese police have set up a team to reinvestigate the case that British citizen Neil Heywood was found dead in Chongqing on Nov. 15, 2011, which was alleged by Wang Lijun who entered, without authorization, the U.S. general consulate in Chengdu on Feb. 6 and stayed there, Xinhua learned from authorities.

Police authorities paid high attention to the case, and set up the team to reinvestigate the case according to law with an attitude to seek truth from facts.

According to investigation results, Bogu Kailai, wife of Comrade Bo Xilai, and their son were in good terms with Heywood. However, they had conflict over economic interests, which had been intensified.

According to reinvestigation results, the existing evidence indicated that Heywood died of homicide, of which Bogu Kailai and Zhang Xiaojun, an orderly at Bo's home, are highly suspected.

Bogu Kailai and Zhang Xiaojun have been transferred to judicial authorities on suspected crime of intentional homicide.
According to senior officials from related authorities, China is a socialist country ruled by law, and the sanctity and authority of law shall not be tramped. Whoever has broken the law will be handled in accordance with law and will not be tolerated, no matter who is involved.

Source: Xinhua

Expert view

Cai Zhiqiang, a professor on Party building with the Party School of the CPC Central Committee, told the Global Times yesterday that the incident would neither disrupt the Party’s 18th National Congress in fall nor the country’s long-term political and social development.

The selection of our cadre group follows its own path, and wouldn’t be affected by any single incident. Any generation of the Party’s central collective leadership will definitely follow the Party’s line and guiding policies, Cai said.

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