Monday, April 21, 2014



GT Exclusive Report
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Links Key to Oz Role
 au In the Five Year Plan there is an emphasis on services. I led a mission to China in Augst last year when we visited major provincial centers and we had hudrends of business representatives on that mission. We got a sense there are enormous opprotunites to engage more deeply or widely in the service sector.

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By Qiu Wei, Yu Jincui and Wen Ya
Engaging Positively with China
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It is broadly accepted that the Sino-Australian relationship is stronger and runs deeper than ever before. The two nations enjoy growing economic ties and China's expanding energy demand has made this growth even more explicit.

To assess the current nature of the Australia-China relationship, Global Times (GT) reporters talked to Warwick Smith, Chair of the Australia-China Council (ACC) under the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in Sydney, on inter-personal links, the prominence of the bilateral relationship and potentials for further development.

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By Qiu Wei and Guo Fang in Sydney


Chinese immigrants make 'enormous contribution'
 au There are many local communities where the Chinese migrants are very active. China's migrants have made great contribution in terms of medicine and science to Australia, in terms of political life, in terms of business, trade and economic growth. Particularly around this time of year, China's New Year, there are many celebrations of that around the country over the fortnight.

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By Wen Ya
AU Faces Challege
  If China grows fast enough to realize the Australians' economic hopes, it will become too rich and powerful, and further continue to threaten US strategic primacy. In that case we have to hope the Chinese economy will collapse...But if we hope to keep growing, we have to hope the Chinese economy will keep growing. 

But if we hope to keep growing, we have to hope the Chinese economy will keep growing. So there is a mismatch between the strategic future and the economic future, which hasn't been resolved in Australia today.

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By Hugh White
Uncertainty about China
 

As for China's rise and impact, my key word is uncertainty. A lot of perceptions in the minds of government, not just in Australia butalso in many countries in the Asia-Pacific region,  stem from the fact that we simply don't know how a powerful China will behave in the future.

If we look at China's changing capabilities, its ability to act militarily, as well as its interests and needs, energy and resources in particular, we don't know what impact these will have. It's quite natural for countries that are accustomed to a very different regional order to hedge.

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By Rory Medcalf
Old Ties Not Welcomed
   China is Australia's largest trading partner. Two-way trade between Australia and China last year was almost $120 billion. The future economic prosperity of Australia is tied very directly to prosperity and economic development of China.

We have 15 years of increasingly close collaboration, particularly strategic dialogue, with China that will continue in the future.

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By Neil Orme
Study Life in Melting-Pot AU
  When Zheng first arrived at Mac-quarie in March 2010, everything in this melting-pot nation made him curious. He'd selected a field of study that he hoped would help him immigrate, which has long been a dream. 

"I had thought my spoken English was fluent, when in fact there was a lot I couldn't pick up," he said. "During dis-cussions and debates with my foreign classmates, their language and logic made my head spin. It was really frus-trating."      

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Relax in AU!
Vehicles drive past the entrance to Robertson Barracks in Darwin, home of Australia’s 1st Brigade military unit. A contingent of US marines is to be deployed at the military base in northern Australia. Photo: Qiu Wei/GT
The world-renowned Sydney Opera House. Photo: Wen Ya /GT
The famous cross-straits bridge near Circular Quay in Sydney, Australia. Photo: Wen Ya /GT
A small sailboat makes its way through Circular Quay in Sydney, Australia. Photo: Wen Ya /GT
A small maritime station sits in the middle of Circular Quay in Sydney, Australia. Photo: Wen Ya /GT
A small sailboat makes its way through Circular Quay in Sydney, Australia. Photo: Wen Ya /GT
A woman enjoys reading a book at Manly Beach, Circular Quay, in Sydney, Australia. Photo: Wen Ya /GT
A bird enjoys a refreshing day at Manly Beach, Circular Quay, in Sydney, Australia. Photo: Wen Ya /GT
A couple plays with a group of birds on Manly Beach, Circular Quay, in Sydney, Australia. Photo: Wen Ya /GT
Locals and tourists enjoy a beautiful day at Manly Beach in Sydney, Australia. Photo: Yu Jincui /GT
A visitor enjoys the refreshing water at Manly Beach in Sydney, Australia. Photo: Yu Jincui /GT
An Australian Cockatoo eats in a tree in Sydney, Australia. Photo: Yu Jincui /GT
 
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Chinese Elements
The Australian branch office of China’s Kuomintang (KMT) located in Sydney’s Chinatown district. Photo: Wen Ya /GT
The entrance to Chinatown in Sydney, Australia. Photo: Wen Ya /GT
A traditional Chinese medicine store in Sydney’s Chinatown district. Photo: Yu Jincui /GT
A Chinese township club in Sydney’s Chinatown district. Photo: Wen Ya /GT
 
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