China's largest freshwater lake sees dramatic water level decline

Source:Xinhua Published: 2016/10/11 16:35:01

Fishing boats are seen on the exposed bed of Poyang Lake in Lushan City, east China's Jiangxi Province, Oct. 10, 2016. China's largest freshwater lake, Poyang Lake, has seen dramatically decreasing water level in recent days. The lake hit low-water levels about 54 days earlier than average in previous years, according to statistics by the Jiangxi provincial hydrographic bureau. (Xinhua/Hu Chenhuan)


 

Cattle graze on the exposed bed of Poyang Lake in Lushan City, east China's Jiangxi Province, Oct. 10, 2016. China's largest freshwater lake, Poyang Lake, has seen dramatically decreasing water level in recent days. The lake hit low-water levels about 54 days earlier than average in previous years, according to statistics by the Jiangxi provincial hydrographic bureau. (Xinhua/Hu Chenhuan)


 

A large area of exposed bed of Poyang Lake is seen in Lushan City, east China's Jiangxi Province, Oct. 10, 2016. China's largest freshwater lake, Poyang Lake, has seen dramatically decreasing water level in recent days. The lake hit low-water levels about 54 days earlier than average in previous years, according to statistics by the Jiangxi provincial hydrographic bureau. (Xinhua/Hu Chenhuan)


 

Tourists visit an ancient architecture on the exposed bed of the Poyang Lake in Lushan City, east China's Jiangxi Province, Oct. 10, 2016. China's largest freshwater lake, Poyang Lake, has seen dramatically decreasing water level in recent days. The lake hit low-water levels about 54 days earlier than average in previous years, according to statistics by the Jiangxi provincial hydrographic bureau. (Xinhua/Hu Chenhuan)


 

Dead fish are seen on the dried-up bed of Poyang Lake in Lushan City, east China's Jiangxi Province, Oct. 10, 2016. China's largest freshwater lake, Poyang Lake, has seen dramatically decreasing water level in recent days. The lake hit low-water levels about 54 days earlier than average in previous years, according to statistics by the Jiangxi provincial hydrographic bureau. (Xinhua/Hu Chenhuan)


 

Posted in: China, Environment

blog comments powered by Disqus