Famed HK, Taiwan artists pulled from numerous mainland music platforms

By Zhang Yuchen Source:Globaltimes.cn Published: 2017/1/7 22:25:25

Works of some pop artists from Hong Kong and Taiwan were found to be missing from the majority of mainland streaming music platforms on Friday, triggering off speculations that they have been banned due to their political leanings, but some believe the trend is most likely the result of music licensing infringements. 

Mandopop mega artists such as Vivian Xu from Taiwan and Hong Kong’s Bobby Chen and Anthony Wong were missing on NetEase Cloud Music as of Friday evening. 

By Saturday, many of Taiwan and Hong Kong artists were pulled from major streaming platforms such as QQ Music, NetEase Cloud Music, Kugou Music and Baidu Music. 

Neither the government nor the music companies involved have made statements on the matter as of press time. A call to NetEase on Saturday night went unanswered. 

Alibaba-owned Xiami Music was streaming the above artists as of Saturday night. According to The Beijing News, Xiami holds the licensing copyright to Bobby Chen’s catalogue.

However, numerous media outlets did not hesitate to run and repost stories alleging the Taiwan and Hong Kong artists had been banned due to their political leanings.

“I think it is right to remove some singers although I appreciate their talents. After all, support of Taiwan and Hong Kong independence are not right,” Zhang Haihuai wrote Saturday on Wechat account Rockerfm.

“As music fans, we just want to listen to the songs we like but this is harder and harder to realize,” the article wrote.

Many netizens chose to focus not on the possibility of music copyright conflicts and more on politics.

An ad campaign for cosmetic brand CHANDO featuring Vivian Xu had been pulled. The Taiwan pop star had been replaced in the ad by Mainland actress Zhao Liying. 

Xu had found disfavor among fans in the mainland in 2010 following comments made in Tokyo that Japan was “like her adoptive mother.” 


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