China marks 86th anniversary of "September 18 Incident"

Source:Xinhua Published: 2017/9/19 7:51:12

Students of the Dacheng School sing a song at a ceremony to mark the 86th anniversary of the "September 18 Incident" at the Museum of the War of Chinese People's Resistance against Japanese Aggression in Beijing, capital of China, Sept. 18, 2017. On September 18, 1931, the Japanese Kwantung Army stationed in northeast China destroyed a section of the railway near Liutiaohu and then falsely accused the Chinese military of causing the explosion. Using this as a pretext, the Japanese then bombarded Shenyang and began invasion of northeast China. (Xinhua/Luo Xiaoguang)


 

Zheng Yimei (1st R, front), director of the Student Center of the Marco Polo Bridge Education Group, leads students to make a solemn vow at a ceremony to mark the 86th anniversary of the "September 18 Incident" at the Museum of the War of Chinese People's Resistance against Japanese Aggression in Beijing, capital of China, Sept. 18, 2017. On September 18, 1931, the Japanese Kwantung Army stationed in northeast China destroyed a section of the railway near Liutiaohu and then falsely accused the Chinese military of causing the explosion. Using this as a pretext, the Japanese then bombarded Shenyang and began invasion of northeast China. (Xinhua/Luo Xiaoguang)


 

A military band play the national anthem at a ceremony to mark the 86th anniversary of the "September 18 Incident" at the September 18 Incident History Museum in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, Sept. 18, 2017. On September 18, 1931, the Japanese Kwantung Army stationed in northeast China destroyed a section of the railway near Liutiaohu and then falsely accused the Chinese military of causing the explosion. Using this as a pretext, the Japanese then bombarded Shenyang and began invasion of northeast China. (Xinhua/Pan Yulong)


 

People attend a ceremony to mark the 86th anniversary of the "September 18 Incident" at the September 18 Incident History Museum in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, Sept. 18, 2017. On September 18, 1931, the Japanese Kwantung Army stationed in northeast China destroyed a section of the railway near Liutiaohu and then falsely accused the Chinese military of causing the explosion. Using this as a pretext, the Japanese then bombarded Shenyang and began invasion of northeast China. (Xinhua/Pan Yulong)


 

A soldier is seen at a ceremony to mark the 86th anniversary of the "September 18 Incident" at the September 18 Incident History Museum in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, Sept. 18, 2017. On September 18, 1931, the Japanese Kwantung Army stationed in northeast China destroyed a section of the railway near Liutiaohu and then falsely accused the Chinese military of causing the explosion. Using this as a pretext, the Japanese then bombarded Shenyang and began invasion of northeast China. (Xinhua/Pan Yulong)


 

Student attend a ceremony to mark the 86th anniversary of the "September 18 Incident" at the September 18 Incident History Museum in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, Sept. 18, 2017. On September 18, 1931, the Japanese Kwantung Army stationed in northeast China destroyed a section of the railway near Liutiaohu and then falsely accused the Chinese military of causing the explosion. Using this as a pretext, the Japanese then bombarded Shenyang and began invasion of northeast China. (Xinhua/Pan Yulong)


 

People attend a ceremony to mark the 86th anniversary of the "September 18 Incident" at the September 18 Incident History Museum in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, Sept. 18, 2017. On September 18, 1931, the Japanese Kwantung Army stationed in northeast China destroyed a section of the railway near Liutiaohu and then falsely accused the Chinese military of causing the explosion. Using this as a pretext, the Japanese then bombarded Shenyang and began invasion of northeast China. (Xinhua/Pan Yulong)


 

Posted in: POLITICS,SOCIETY,CHINA

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