Alvarez-Golovkin ‘decision’ proves boxing is still corrupt

By Rob Vogt Source:Global Times Published: 2017/9/20 23:48:40

Hard-core boxing fans decried last month's Floyd Mayweather-­Conor McGregor bout as a farce - an overhyped mockery of an event designed to generate a huge payday, boxing's reputation be damned. While these fans weren't 100 percent wrong, last weekend's draw between Canelo Alvarez and Gennady Golovkin definitely stole some of their rhetorical thunder.

Without question, Mayweather-McGregor was a gaudy, made-for-television spectacle. And while its first media event generated tons of interest, subsequent events were both anti-climactic (repetitive gimmicks) and borderline offensive (allegations of various types of slurs).

But the fight itself wasn't the competitive sham many boxing fans thought it would be. The scrappy McGregor took the fight to Mayweather early and held his own into the 10th round, when his conditioning limits (MMA fights are shorter than boxing matches) allowed Mayweather to swoop in and score a technical knockout.

In the end, McGregor's performance embarrassed neither himself nor the sport of mixed martial arts. The same cannot be said about Saturday's controversial draw between Alvarez and Golovkin. Not only did the final outcome prove unsatisfying to fans, bettors, and sportsbooks (boxing's holy trinity); judge Adelaide Byrd's confounding 118-110 scorecard in favor of Alvarez exposed one of boxing's long-held dirty little secrets: inept judging.

And although Nevada State Athletic Commission Executive Director Bob Bennett has promised to give Byrd "a little break" before allowing her to judge future big-time bouts, the damage has already been done. The Alvarez-Golovkin match-up was the perfect chance for boxing to capitalize on the afterglow of Mayweather-McGregor and regain some of its past glory. Instead, boxing delivered a "same as it ever was" moment.

A sport that launched the careers of convicted criminals Don King (manslaughter) and Mike Tyson (rape) doesn't get to claim the high moral ground very often. Saturday's showcase in Las Vegas proved that the action inside the ring is still just as shady as the action outside of it.

The author is a Chicago-based writer. robvogtwriting@gmail.com


blog comments powered by Disqus