Yearender: Giant pandas, China's furry ambassadors

Source:Xinhua Published: 2017/12/28 14:12:13

Photo taken on Dec. 18, 2017 shows giant panda cub Xiang Xiang at Tokyo's Ueno Zoological Gardens, Japan. A ceremony was held on Monday at Tokyo's Ueno Zoological Gardens to mark the upcoming public debut of giant panda cub Xiang Xiang. (Xinhua)


 
As a unique species of China, the giant panda symbolizes peace and friendship. These furry ambassadors, regarded by the Chinese as national treasures, are adored worldwide.

This October, Giant panda was named an "Asia Game Changer" by the Asia Society for its role played in promoting friendly relationships between countries.

The Asia Game Changer Awards were launched by the Asia Society in 2014, which recognize those making a transformative and positive difference for the future of Asia and the world.

Photo taken on Dec. 18, 2017 shows giant panda cub Xiang Xiang at Tokyo's Ueno Zoological Gardens, Japan. A ceremony was held on Monday at Tokyo's Ueno Zoological Gardens to mark the upcoming public debut of giant panda cub Xiang Xiang. (Xinhua)


 

French President Emmanuel Macron (C, Front) reacts with the panda cub Yuan Meng at Beauval zoo in Saint-Aignan, central France, on Dec. 16, 2017. French President Emmanuel Macron on Saturday visited Yuan Meng, the country's first-ever panda cub, while he was celebrating his 40th birthday with family at Beauval zoo, the zoo said in a statement. (Xinhua/Beauval zoo)


 

Danish Prime Minister Lars Loekke Rasmussen (C) and Chinese Ambassador to Denmark Deng Ying (R) present to children gifts during the groundbreaking ceremony for a giant panda enclosure at the Copenhagen zoo in Copenhagen Nov. 16, 2017. A giant panda enclosure will be built at the zoo for a pair of giant pandas that are scheduled to come to Denmark from China in about one year. (Xinhua/Wu Bo)


 

Giant panda Nuan Nuan is seen at Malaysia's national zoo in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on Oct. 5, 2017. Nuan Nuan (meaning warmth in Chinese), the first Malaysian-born female giant panda cub, will head back to China on Nov. 14, more than two years after her parents unexpectedly gave birth to her on Aug. 18, 2015. (Xinhua/Chong Voon Chung)


 

US First Lady Melania Trump poses for a group photo with pupils during her visit to the giant panda enclosure at the Beijing Zoo in Beijing, capital of China, Nov. 10, 2017. (Xinhua/Pang Xinglei)


 

Photo taken on Nov. 2, 2017 shows the Chinese giant panda Cai Tao at the Indonesia Panda Castle in Taman Safari Indonesia. Indonesian officials supervising the Chinese giant pandas now kept in the nation's safari park said on Thursday that the exotic animals were ready for public expose in the near future after completing a 31-day quarantine period. (Xinhua/Du Yu)


 

Photo taken on Nov. 2, 2017 shows the Chinese giant panda Hu Chun at the Indonesia Panda Castle in Taman Safari Indonesia. Indonesian officials supervising the Chinese giant pandas now kept in the nation's safari park said on Thursday that the exotic animals were ready for public expose in the near future after completing a 31-day quarantine period. (Xinhua/Du Yu)


 

Two-year-old giant panda twins Jia Panpan and Jia Yueyue play together during their 2nd birthday celebration at the Toronto Zoo in Toronto, Canada, Oct. 13, 2017. The Toronto Zoo hosted the 2nd birthday celebration for the first Canadian-born giant panda twins Jia Panpan (meaning Canadian Hope) and Jia Yueyue (meaning Canadian Joy) on Friday. The female giant panda Er Shun from China gave birth to the twins in Toronto Zoo on Oct. 13, 2015. (Xinhua/Zou Zheng)


 

Giant panda Tian Tian enjoys birthday cake during a celebration for its 20th birthday at Smithsonian's National Zoo in Washington D.C., the United States, Aug. 27, 2017. The zoo held a celebration on Sunday for giant panda Tian Tian's 20th birthday. (Xinhua/Yin Bogu)


 

Panda Yang Yang (R) and its baby Fu Ban play with birthday presents at Schoenbrunn zoo in Vienna, Austria on Aug. 7, 2017. A pair of panda twins, Fu Ban and Fu Feng, born last year here at Schoenbrunn zoo, celebrated their first birthday on Monday with a big party. The birth of the panda twins proved the successful adaption to the new life in Austria of their parents, Yang Yang and Long Hui. The panda couple arrived in Austria in 2003.(Xinhua/Pan Xu)


 

Giant panda Beibei is seen beside its birthday cake during a celebration at Smithsonian's National Zoo in Washington D.C., the United States, Aug. 22, 2017. The zoo on Tuesday held a celebration for giant panda Beibei's two-year-old birthday, which attracted lots of visitors. (Xinhua/Yang Chenglin)


 

An undated photo provided by Edinburgh Zoo shows giant panda Tian Tian at Edinburgh Zoo, Scotland. Tian Tian, the only female Chinese giant panda in Britain, is pregnant, and a cub could be born in September, local media reported here on Aug. 24, 2017. Tian Tian, which means Sweetie in Chinese, was born on Aug. 24, 2003 at the Beijing Zoo in China. She is currently living with Yang Guang, meaning Sunshine in Chinese, at Edinburgh Zoo, Scotland. They are Britain's only pair of pandas. (Xinhua/Edinburgh Zoo)


 

Photo taken on Nov. 2, 2016 shows giant panda Wu Wen in the Wolong National Nature Reserve, southwest China's Sichuan Province. Two giant pandas Xing Ya and Wu Wen, left for the Netherlands on 15-year research mission. (Xinhua/Xue Yubin)


 

Photo taken on April 10, 2017 shows giant panda Xing Ya in the Wolong National Nature Reserve, southwest China's Sichuan Province. Two giant pandas Xing Ya and Wu Wen, left for the Netherlands on 15-year research mission. (Xinhua/Xue Yubin)


 

Posted in: CHINA,ODD PICTURES

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