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New province leaders send subtle message

Source:Global Times Published: 2012-12-19 1:00:05

Chinese society's attention has been focused on the changes to Party secretaries in some provinces such as Guangdong and Zhejiang. The changes in the provincial leadership follow the 18th National Congress of the CPC and offer the public a fresh start. Their political achievements will surely influence the management of the whole province.

The Party secretary is the very top leader in a province. The prominence of this position differs from Western systems and is the key to ensuring that the Party rules the country's political system.

The division of provinces, autonomous regions and municipalities are the basis of the country's administrative divisions.

These divisions assist in the implementation of national policies and ensure each region has its own uniqueness. If a Party secretary does well in his job, the development of the country and people's quality of life can be ensured.

The population and economic scale of many provinces exceed those of middle-sized countries. As China is undergoing rapid development and social conflicts, the difficulties in managing a province can be much greater than managing a global power.

China's system arrangement requires Party secretaries to have the capability to manage the overall situation. They should exude authority while being popular among the public.

There are cities, counties and townships under a province. Provincial leadership needs to have a clear knowledge of the situation of these levels. While these levels have become the hotspot for social problems, provincial leaders should be able to solve them at the local level while considering the national environment. They should also take the online environment into consideration.

Party secretaries are the elites from the Party's top leadership. It is hoped that these new Party secretaries can gain more experience from their political careers, thus making China's politics advance with the time.

Chinese officials generally keep a low profile. This is a virtue on the one hand.

But on the other hand, as public opinion often dominates how an incident unravels, there have been more and more cases when their low profile has been misunderstood.

Party secretaries should make efforts to improve communication with the public. We are looking forward to those who are outspoken and can interact with the public.

A new political style has been showcased by the Party's top leadership. These new provincial leaders are expected to emulate it in solving local problems.

This will need to involve not only positive attitudes but also a willingness to shoulder responsibilities for all kinds of incidents, whenever they may occur.

Posted in: Editorial