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Zero tolerance for graft creates momentum

Source:Global Times Published: 2014-1-20 0:23:01

General Secretary of the CPC Central Committee Xi Jinping delivered a speech at the Third Plenum of the CPC Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, stressing that the clampdown on corruption must be adhered to and the anti-graft campaign must be carried forward with zero tolerance.

Under the banner of bringing all corrupt officials to justice, be they big shots or small potatoes, the anti-graft campaign of the previous year continues to insist on zero tolerance. The unexpectedly strong effect of this campaign has been felt by almost the whole population.

China is now at the critical moment of an all-out transformation to a modern society by taking this anti-corruption campaign as a breakthrough. Chinese officialdom, as well as the entire deep-rooted bureaucratic culture, meets an unprecedented challenge. The call for zero tolerance comes from both the top leadership and public opinion, and it will not be carried out on a whim. This marks the beginning of a new style of governing for Chinese administration.

Clamping down on corruption and other misdeeds of civil servants supplies an opportunity to China's deepening reform, giving impetus to break the entrenched shackles of the mind and lack of self-confidence. China encounters and tackles problems and challenges while deepening its reform. Its strength to advance is growing bigger as more objectives are accomplished.

The anti-graft campaign will first come into effect in the civil service. But its influence will be much expanded and touch the core of Chinese society, which values connections the most. Such influence will cleanse society where noncompliance with the rule of law will be reduced, the philosophies of both civil servants and ordinary people will be changed, and the ways to distribute social interests will also be optimized.

Those "hidden rules" which have badly tarnished the image of Chinese civil service will withdraw from Chinese official circles, and the currently prevalent understandings about "officials" and "public authority" will be changed utterly. This current change in mindset will also involve many fields, such as education and medical care.

When a new universal sense of values takes shape, any kind of power abuse will be spotted and revealed. Those who bend the law will be punished by the law.

This outlook cannot be reached if we fail to carry on and deepen the anti-graft campaigns. For now, what we see is a flash of hope, but it can only become reality when we spare no effort in pursuing it.

The resolution and actions of the central government have been clearly revealed to the public, which cannot let this rare opportunity to reshape Chinese society go. The whole undertaking needs to be accomplished with a joint effort between the government and the ordinary people.

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