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25 years on, society firmer about its path

Source:Global Times Published: 2014-6-4 15:14:59

A group of the US Congress members recently proposed renaming the street outside China's Embassy in Washington in honor of the jailed Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo. Liu was awarded the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize and was sentenced to 11 years in prison in 2009 for participating in drafting Charter 08 and launching the signature campaign.

At the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen incident in 1989, mainstream media outlets from the US and Europe have ramped up reports on China's crackdown on illegal activities in the public sphere.

Chinese dissidents exiled in the US and Europe have organized a series of activities to manifest their presence. These reports and activities attempt to create an impression that Chinese society, surrounded by "universal" political appeals, is sitting atop of dangerous incidents and that the Chinese government is very scared.

The mendacious impression is made by anti-China forces in the West and Chinese exiles who have been marginalized there. They hope it will deal a heavy blow to the stability of Chinese society but they will end up failing.

China has shielded relevant information in a bid to wield a positive influence on the smooth development of reform and opening-up. The generation that experienced the incident has developed a deeper understanding of it through China's growth and such tragedies as the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the fall of communism in Eastern Europe and the Arab Spring.

The younger generation has avoided being misled by forces antagonistic to China's current political system. Chinese society has never forgotten the incident 25 years ago but not talking about it indicates the attitude of society.

Anti-China forces and Chinese exiles in the West have spared no efforts recently but they will be disappointed again. Chinese people are busy with various reforms and different groups are pursuing their own interests. The majority of people are confident in China's progress and willing to change the country through comprehensive reform. They are uninterested in revolutionary calls from abroad.

Chinese society still remembers how poor we were 25 years ago. But the country has grown into the world's second largest economy today. Disintegration of the Soviet Union, civil war in Yugoslavia, and what is happening in Ukraine and Thailand have disturbed us more than preaching and appeals from the West. We have witnessed that almost all Chinese recipients of Western awards are dissidents. The West has also granted activity space and open support to Xinjiang and Tibetan separatists. These are powerful lessons for Chinese people.

We will not follow the steps of the West. Even those who are captivated by Western ideology are alert to the possibility of the country sinking into turbulence. Only a small number of Chinese are willing to dance to the Western tune, the majority of whom have also calculated their personal interests. They aren't necessarily the idealists acclaimed by themselves and the West.

China has found an effective growth path. An increasingly diversified Chinese society is treasuring this path generally. What happened 25 years ago and many incidents of turbulence in the world have taught us to be wiser.

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