Coolest ice structures from around the globe

Source: Agencies Published: 2015/8/10 17:06:19

Highlights: As summer temperatures continue to rise, chill out with images from some of the world’s most outstanding examples of ice-inspired architecture.

  • Tourists visit a two-story ice bar at Lake Shikaribetsu in Japan’s Hokkaido on March 5. Photo: CFP

  • A waitress greets guests at the door of a hot pot restaurant built with bricks of ice in Shenyang, Northeast China’s Liaoning Province on January 19. Photo: CFP

  • Visitors enjoy drinks at the Ice Bar in Madrid, Spain on July 25, 2015. At minus 10 C, Ice Bar is a summer haven for patrons looking to escape the 40 C heat in Madrid. Photo: Evrim Aydin/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images - CFP

  • A bartender pours a drink at an ice restaurant in Changchun in Northeast China’s Jilin Province on January 11. This ice restaurant, which serves hot pot and offers guests ice beds for an “extreme sleep” experience, is made of almost 250 cubes of ice and 50 cubes of snow. It took 20 ice carvers about 15 days to finish the project on December 30, 2014. Photo: CFP

  • Two guests in sleeping bags lay on thick sheepskin rugs to keep warm in minus 40 C of Switzerland’s Iglu-Dorf, the world’s coldest hotel. Built at six locations from the Alps to the Pyrenees every winter, the hotels are open to the public from Christmas to April. Rooms cost $109 a night from Monday to Thursday and $126 from Friday to Sunday. Photo: CFP

  • A waitress arranges cups made of ice at the Ice Palace in Shangri-La Hotel in Harbin, Northeast China’s Heilongjiang Province on January 6, 2014. The Ice Palace, which includes a bar and hot pot restaurant, is open annually from December to February. Temperatures inside are kept around minus 10 C. Photo: Kim Kyung-Hoon/CFP

  • Igloos sit on top of Mount Nebelhorn near the southern Bavarian town of Oberstdorf on December 30, 2013. The village of 11 igloos, which includes a bar and dining area, is open during the winter months until April. One night costs $125 per person. Photo: Michaela Rehle/CFP

  • Tourists visit China’s largest freestanding ice dome in Harbin’s Zhaolin Park on January 22, 2011. Photo: CFP

  • Iced apples are served in an ice house in South Korea’s Busan on July 13, 2010. Photo: CFP

  • A bartender mixes cocktails at an ice bar in Japan’s Tokyo on August 17, 2009. Everything in the bar, from the walls to glasses and chairs, are made from blocks of ice cut from Sweden's Torne River. The entrance fee to the bar is $28 per person. Photo: Junko Kimura/Getty Images - CFP






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