Excavation confirms ruins of China's largest Taoist temple

Source:Xinhua Published: 2018/1/22 14:46:47

Photo taken on Jan. 21, 2018 shows the site of the Great Shangqing Palace at the foot of Longhu Mountain in Yingtan, east China's Jiangxi Province. After a four-year excavation, archeologists have confirmed the location of the Great Shangqing Palace, which is China's largest Taoist temple built in the Song Dynasty (960-1279) and used continuously until it was destroyed by fire in 1930. (Xinhua/Wan Xiang)

Photo taken on Jan. 21, 2018 shows a cultural relic that excavated from the site of the Great Shangqing Palace at the foot of Longhu Mountain in Yingtan, east China's Jiangxi Province. After a four-year excavation, archeologists have confirmed the location of the Great Shangqing Palace, which is China's largest Taoist temple built in the Song Dynasty (960-1279) and used continuously until it was destroyed by fire in 1930. (Xinhua/Wan Xiang)


 

Staff members work at the site of the Great Shangqing Palace at the foot of Longhu Mountain in Yingtan, east China's Jiangxi Province, Jan. 21, 2018. After a four-year excavation, archeologists have confirmed the location of the Great Shangqing Palace, which is China's largest Taoist temple built in the Song Dynasty (960-1279) and used continuously until it was destroyed by fire in 1930. (Xinhua/Wan Xiang)


 

Staff members work at the site of the Great Shangqing Palace at the foot of Longhu Mountain in Yingtan, east China's Jiangxi Province, Jan. 21, 2018. After a four-year excavation, archeologists have confirmed the location of the Great Shangqing Palace, which is China's largest Taoist temple built in the Song Dynasty (960-1279) and used continuously until it was destroyed by fire in 1930. (Xinhua/Wan Xiang)

Photo taken on Jan. 21, 2018 shows a cultural relic that excavated from the site of the Great Shangqing Palace at the foot of Longhu Mountain in Yingtan, east China's Jiangxi Province. After a four-year excavation, archeologists have confirmed the location of the Great Shangqing Palace, which is China's largest Taoist temple built in the Song Dynasty (960-1279) and used continuously until it was destroyed by fire in 1930. (Xinhua/Wan Xiang)


 

Photo taken on Jan. 21, 2018 shows a cultural relic that excavated from the site of the Great Shangqing Palace at the foot of Longhu Mountain in Yingtan, east China's Jiangxi Province. After a four-year excavation, archeologists have confirmed the location of the Great Shangqing Palace, which is China's largest Taoist temple built in the Song Dynasty (960-1279) and used continuously until it was destroyed by fire in 1930. (Xinhua/Wan Xiang)

Staff members work at the site of the Great Shangqing Palace at the foot of Longhu Mountain in Yingtan, east China's Jiangxi Province, Jan. 21, 2018. After a four-year excavation, archeologists have confirmed the location of the Great Shangqing Palace, which is China's largest Taoist temple built in the Song Dynasty (960-1279) and used continuously until it was destroyed by fire in 1930. (Xinhua/Wan Xiang)

Photo taken on Jan. 21, 2018 shows a cultural relic that excavated from the site of the Great Shangqing Palace at the foot of Longhu Mountain in Yingtan, east China's Jiangxi Province. After a four-year excavation, archeologists have confirmed the location of the Great Shangqing Palace, which is China's largest Taoist temple built in the Song Dynasty (960-1279) and used continuously until it was destroyed by fire in 1930. (Xinhua/Wan Xiang)


 

Photo taken on Jan. 21, 2018 shows cultural relics that excavated from the site of the Great Shangqing Palace at the foot of Longhu Mountain in Yingtan, east China's Jiangxi Province. After a four-year excavation, archeologists have confirmed the location of the Great Shangqing Palace, which is China's largest Taoist temple built in the Song Dynasty (960-1279) and used continuously until it was destroyed by fire in 1930. (Xinhua/Wan Xiang)


 

Photo taken on Jan. 21, 2018 shows the site of the Great Shangqing Palace at the foot of Longhu Mountain in Yingtan, east China's Jiangxi Province. After a four-year excavation, archeologists have confirmed the location of the Great Shangqing Palace, which is China's largest Taoist temple built in the Song Dynasty (960-1279) and used continuously until it was destroyed by fire in 1930. (Xinhua/Wan Xiang)


 
 
 
 
 
 

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