SOURCE / ECONOMY
Streaming sites Bilibili and Douyu urged to remove vulgar content
Published: Mar 31, 2021 11:33 AM
Chinese online video and gaming company Bilibili listed at Hong Kong Stock Exchange on Monday. Photo: CFP

Chinese online video and gaming company Bilibili listed at Hong Kong Stock Exchange on Monday. Photo: CFP





Chinese video streaming platform Bilibili and livestreaming platform Douyu have become the target of China's recent scrutiny of cyber culture in a bid to protect the minors. 

A number of instances of illegal cases were found in an inspection by market regulator affiliated under China's Ministry of Cultural of Tourism in February, the ministry accounted on Tuesday. The Hong-Kong listed video streaming platform Bilibili and livestreaming platform Douyu were among the sites.

The market regulator checked over 29,000 websites, APPs and WeChat accounts of cultural products. To date, 54 cases have been settled, 2,163 illegal problems have been rectified, and some cases are being handled.

The inspection is aimed at cracking down vulgar content, rich admiration and contents that harm social morality.

Chinese online video and gaming company Bilibili was urged to remove all illegal animation and video content offline and address what has become an increasingly widespread issue.

The Chinese tech firm had its Hong Kong IPO last Wednesday.

As of the fourth quarter of 2020, monthly active users of Bilibili reached 202 million, with 86 percent of users aged 35 or under.

Chinese streaming platform Douyu was also urged to carry out an internal content audit, addressing 356 flagged live rooms, banning 27 related accounts.

Market regulators in Beijing have urged all network culture business units to conduct self-examination and rectification, which cleaned up more than 1.59 million pieces of false information, and closed more than 150,000 illegal accounts.

In order to further standardize the market order of cyber culture, the Ministry of Cultural of Tourism will carry out centralized investigation on major domestic online animation, online music, online performance websites and apps as part of a new push to improve China's digital communities, the ministry said.

Global Times 


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