SOURCE / ECONOMY
US’ nomination of Huawei case prosecutor to key China export post sends a tough signal: experts
Published: Jul 30, 2021 11:07 AM
Meng Wanzhou Photo:VCG

Meng Wanzhou Photo:VCG



The future US policy toward China may become increasingly tough, after Biden Administration's Huawei case prosecutor was nominated to a key China export post, experts said.

US prosecutor Thea Kendler, an attorney on the case against China's Huawei and its Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou, will be nominated for a Commerce Department post vital to controlling exports to China, Reuters reported on Thursday.

Kendler, an attorney in the Justice Department's national security division, will be nominated as assistant secretary for export administration at the US Commerce Department.

He is expected to work under Alan Estevez, a former Pentagon official, who was nominated on July 13 to be the Commerce Department's undersecretary for industry and security, a position central to the China-US tech war.

The US government's choice of Kendler reflects that policy toward China may become increasingly tough, the restrictions on Huawei may not be relaxed in the future, said Lü Xiang, a research fellow on US studies at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in Beijing.

"Kendler is expected to become a powerful proxy for Biden to realize his economic and trade strategic intention toward China," Lü told the Global Times on Thursday.

Two US senators on Wednesday said they are introducing a measure to prohibit funds in a $1.9 trillion government funding from being used to purchase Chinese telecommunications equipment from Huawei, ZTE and other companies deemed as security threats, Reuters reported.

The Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs has repeatedly refuted the so-called security threat theory, and urged the US to stop generalizing the concept of national security, deliberately discrediting China and suppressing Chinese specific enterprises, and provide fairness, justice and support for the normal operation of Chinese enterprises in the US.


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