OPINION / VIEWPOINT
US-led ‘psychological wars’ against Russia, China lead to all lose situation
Published: May 02, 2021 11:53 AM
People walk in Red Square in Moscow, Russia, on Jan. 15, 2021.(Photo: Xinhua)

People walk in Red Square in Moscow, Russia, on Jan. 15, 2021.(Photo: Xinhua)

Editor's Note:
 

Andrei Ilnitsky, an advisor to Russian defense minister, said in an interview at the end of March that the US and the West are waging a "mental war" against Russia. Why does the West resort to the psychological war? How will Russia cope with the psychological war? Global Times (GT) reporters Wang Wenwen and Lu Yuanzhi interviewed Andrey Kortunov (Kortunov), director general of the Russian International Affairs Council, on these issues by email.

GT: What are the features of such a psychological war?

Kortunov: There is nothing new about psychological wars - they have always been a part of standard military operations. The goal has been to demoralize both your enemy's army and its population at large in order to break down the will of your opponent to fight and to resist.  Ancient kings, emperors and warlords broadly used over-exaggeration, deception, disinformation, mythology, and so on. However, today states commonly use these instruments of psychological wars not only during military conflicts, but in the peacetime as well.  Moreover, new information technology offers plenty of innovative ways to get your message to select target audiences in a foreign country; you can customize and focus this message as never before. Each of us is a target in this warfare, even if we do not feel it.   

GT: The US-led West used to wage color revolutions on countries they deem as adversaries. What are the differences between the color revolution and the psychological war? Why does the West resort to the psychological war? 

Kortunov: A color revolution is an unconstitutional regime change caused by sizeable and sometimes violent street activities of the radical opposition. Western leaders usually welcome such changes and arguably render them diverse political, organizational and financial assistance. Nevertheless, a regime change cannot come from nowhere. There should be significant political, social, economic or ethnic problems that, if remain unresolved for a long time, gradually lead to a color revolution. Psychological wars help to articulate unresolved problems, deprive the leadership of a target country of legitimacy in the eyes of its own population and, ultimately, prepare a color revolution.     

GT: What are the likely outcomes for the West's psychological war on Russia? How will Russia cope with the psychological war? 

Kortunov: Russian authorities are trying to limit opportunities for the West to wage the psychological war by exposing Western disinformation and imposing restrictions on select Western media, NGOs and foundations that are perceived as instruments of waging the war. 

GT: Is the West capable of launching a military offensive on Russia? 

Kortunov: Russia remains a nuclear superpower with very significant military capabilities. A nuclear war with Moscow could lead to the annihilation of the humankind and therefore cannot be considered a feasible option.  Even a full-fledged conventional conflict between Russia and the West in Europe would turn into a catastrophe of an epic scale for both sides. It does not necessarily mean that we can rule out such a scenario, but I think that if there were a war, it would erupt because of an inadvertent escalation rather than because of a rational decision to launch a military offensive.    

GT: The West has never dropped the illusion of changing China's and Russia's systems to that similar of the West by adopting the tactic of "peaceful evolution." How could Russia and China join hands in face of such Western attempts?

Kortunov: Indeed, many in the West still believe that their system has a universal value and that eventually both Russia and China should move to Western-type liberal political systems. These views are less popular now than they were twenty or thirty years ago, but we cannot ignore them. Moscow and Beijing have the right to defend themselves against the Western ideological and psychological offensive. Still, I see the solution to the problem of psychological wars in a "psychological peace" should be based on a common understanding on what is allowed in the international information exchange and what is not. Russia and China could work together in defining a new code of conduct regulating the trans-border information flows. In the immediate future, the West will be reluctant to accept this code, but we should keep trying. In my view, this is the only way to proceed; if psychological wars continue, there will be no winners and losers - everybody will lose.    


blog comments powered by Disqus