CHINA / SOCIETY
Popular Chinese streaming platform removed from App store over alleged illegal content
Published: Jun 06, 2021 04:49 PM
Renren Video Photo: VCG

Renren Video Photo: VCG


Renren Video, or rr.tv, one of the most popular Chinese streaming service platforms offering free subtitled foreign television shows and films, has been removed from iPhone's App store, the Global Times has found. The app also suspended its "Kuaikan," or Quick View service over alleged violation of laws, according to an announcement it posted on Sunday.

The announcement posted in the "Kuaikan" column of the rr.tv app on Sunday states that it accepts criticisms from users and will immediately shelve the function and look into the matter, vowing to deal seriously with the illegal content and accounts involved according to the law on network information management. 

Renren Video, or rr.tv, one of the most popular Chinese streaming service platforms offering free subtitled foreign television shows and films, has been removed from iPhone's App store, the Global Times has found. Photo: screenshot of Renren Video app.

Renren Video, or rr.tv, one of the most popular Chinese streaming service platforms offering free subtitled foreign television shows and films, has been removed from iPhone's App store, the Global Times has found. Photo: screenshot of Renren Video app.



The Global Times found that as of press time, the App store for iPhone/iPad users has removed the rr.tv app from downloads, but people who had already installed the app can still use it to view foreign TV shows and films, except for some of the most popular ones, like Why Women Kill, and Mare of Easttown. Android users can still obtain the app in its store, but the Kuaikan service has also been suspended. 

The platform has a total of 160 million users with an average of over 40 million active users per month, ifeng.com reported on Sunday. 

In February, another well-known streaming platform for Chinese audiences to binge-watch overseas TV shows, the "YYeTs subtitle group," was padlocked by Shanghai police over copyright infringement. Some 14 people were arrested for providing unauthorized film and TV shows obtained from overseas pirate forums to Chinese viewers, according to a local police announcement.

Global Times


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