CHINA / DIPLOMACY
Documentary shows contribution of Chinese peacekeeping forces
Published: Oct 15, 2021 01:23 AM
Chinese United Nations Peacekeeping Forces take part in the Shared Destiny 2021 joint training operation in Queshan county, Central China’s Henan Province, on Wednesday. Peacekeeping troops from China, Thailand, Mongolia and Pakistan participated in the 10-day exercise that included medical evacuation and epidemic control drills. Photo: VCG

Chinese United Nations Peacekeeping Forces take part in the Shared Destiny 2021 joint training operation in Queshan county, Central China’s Henan Province, on Wednesday. Peacekeeping troops from China, Thailand, Mongolia and Pakistan participated in the 10-day exercise that included medical evacuation and epidemic control drills. Photo: VCG


 
A 15-minute documentary about Chinese peacekeeping forces has been published ahead of the 50th anniversary of the restoration of the Lawful Seat of China in the United Nations, showing the contributions Chinese forces have made to world peace.

The documentary, named For Peace, was released on Tuesday, ahead of the anniversary on October 25.

The documentary consists of a few parts about different people in Chinese peacekeeping teams in African and Asian countries, including soldiers and medical workers.

At the beginning, the story is about Du Zhaoyu, who sacrificed his life in Lebanon when executing tasks as a military observer in 2006. His wife insisted on writing letters to Du even though he has passed away.

The documentary said that Du was a representative of 16 Chinese soldiers who devoted their lives to peacekeeping operations overseas after China joined the UN peacekeeping team in 1990.

“Each deployment is accompanied with devotion, even if it means farewell forever,” the film said.

Another group in the Chinese peacekeeping team are medical workers offering aid to African countries with poor medical services. 

"Loneliness and illness were the biggest challenges for me when I worked as a medical aid worker in a foreign country," recalled Miao Yuankui, 52, a Chinese doctor and a member of the Chinese medical team in Togo.

Miao, who now works in Shanghai, stayed in Lomé, the capital of Togo in West Africa, to provide medical treatment for gynecological diseases along with a Chinese medical team from 2007 to 2009.

"I was infected with malaria within a week after arriving in the African country, and felt helpless and homesick. But after overcoming all these difficulties, my journey in the country was exciting," he told the Global Times.

The documentary showed that Chinese soldiers have found and dealt with more than 10,000 bombs and the first female sapper also successfully executed the clearing task, making land safe again for local residents.
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